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Isang Buwan

Ni Katrina Yamzon

hindi ko tutularan ang buwan
na makikipagtalik lamang
sa bawat mong takipsilim
at sisiping sa kumot ng iyong dilim.

hindi ako magiging wangis ng buwan
na nagkukubli sa kaulapan
sa panahong ika’y tumatangis
at nagbubuhos ng luha’t hinagpis.

hindi ako magiging wangis ng buwan
na nagkukubli sa kaulapan
sa panahong ika’y tumatangis
at nagbubuhos ng luha’t hinagpis.

hindi ako kailanman magiging buwan
na sa iyo’y pumapanaw
na sa iyo’y lilisan
Sa pagdating ng araw.

Love in the time of coronavirus: Weddings back on in Dubai at Philippines Consulate

After weeks of delay, Dubai couples finally got to say ‘I do’

By Angel L. Tesorero

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates–It was not how they planned their big day. But, at least, all’s well that ends well for two pairs of lovebirds who finally professed their marriage vows on Monday, after weeks of delay due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

Love in times of coronavirus: Weddings are back on in Dubai (Video by Irish Eden Belleza and Angel Tesorero)

Filipino expats Vanessa Panotes, 32, and Fretch Brian Pagaduan, 28, were supposed to tie the knot on April 30 in a civil wedding ceremony, followed by a big celebration attended by around 100 guests and a trip to Georgia for their honeymoon.

The second couple, Glaiza Mae Gevero, 27, and Prince RJ Paraico, 31, also planned a big gathering after their wedding that was initially set on April 2.

Bride and Groom get an unusual entry welcome to the consulate
Image Credit: Ahmed Ramzan, Gulf News

But the pandemic happened. Movement restrictions were imposed and big gatherings were banned to curtail the spread of the virus. Weddings at the Philippine Consulate in Dubai were canceled and the couples had to postpone and scale down their plans.

But then again, ‘true love waits’, as the saying goes, and the couples said they actually utilised the downtime to build a stronger bond and ponder on their future.

“During the lockdown, we actually had more time to know each other,” said Mr and Mrs Pagaduan. “Unlike before, when we were both busy at work, we had more time to talk about things and plan our future,” they added.

The Paraicos also were able to draw up concrete plans and set priorities for their married life because of the ‘new normal’ ushered in by the pandemic.

Social distancing and a limit of numbers makes for a more solemn affair – here Prince RJ Paraico and Glaiza Mae Gervero tied the knot
Image Credit: Ahmed Ramzan, Gulf News

Here comes the bride

The wedding day, however, was no less exciting for the two couples. Both brides wore the traditional white dresses and each one carried a bouquet of roses. The grooms too came in white, symbolising their pure intentions.

There were ‘selfies’ but no photographers were allowed, except for the two companions each couple brought with them to bear witness to their wedding, as prescribed by Philippine law.

Precautionary measures were also strictly observed. Everyone was checked by the guard at the gate for their body temperature before entering the consular premises. Face masks and hand gloves were required to be put on throughout the ceremony, and physical distancing was observed – except for the couples, who were allowed to sat, shoulder to shoulder, beside each other.

Only four chairs were placed in the hall; there was no other furniture aside from the small table in front of the couple, where they signed the marriage contract. A rostrum was set for the solemnising officer, who was at least three metres away from the couple. There were the Philippine and ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) flags and only the portraits of the Philippine president and vice president served as the other witnesses to the ceremony.

Prince RJ Paraico with Glaiza Mae Gevero: Awkward moments came when the bride and groom decided not to put the ring on the glove hand and whether to kiss with the mask on or off.
Image Credit: Ahmed Ramzan, Gulf News

Simple and more solemn

Civil weddings are now done one at time at the Philippine consulate, unlike before when Rizal Hall, where weddings took place, was filled to the brim with at least 20 couples and their witnesses.

Solemnising officer, Philippine deputy consul-general Renato Dueñas Jr., said: “The difference now is we do the wedding one couple at a time. It is actually quieter and more solemn as it should be.”

“Before, the hall was crowded with more than 20 couples – because we had weddings only once a week. Now, we had to observe physical distancing but the good thing is the ceremony has become more solemn and more meaningful to the couples,” he further explained.

He added: “As for my advice, I hope they will be stronger in facing the challenges in life and have a real, lasting relationship as husband and wife.”

Solemnising officer Renato Duenas Jr prefers the decorum of less people and less couples
Image Credit: Ahmed Ramzan, Gulf News

Start of a new life

Each ceremony was over in under 15 minutes. There were a few awkward moments during the wedding. At one time, one of the brides can’t decide whether or not to put the wedding ring with the hand glove on. One of the grooms also can’t decide to remove the mask before kissing the bride.

The couples also had simple receptions after their wedding, with only immediate family members and a handful close friends attending. Honeymoon plans were postponed and bigger celebrations will take place some other time.

But the marriage itself, according to the couples, was an indication that things will return to normal soon.

“Our weddings symbolised hope and the start of new life in the time of COVID,” the couples agreed. #

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This article was first published by Gulf News.

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